Sorry, These 8 Jewelry Trends Are Out, But These 8 Are In

When it comes to shopping for jewelry, clothes, and other accessories for that matter, my motto is to always go with what brings you the most excitement and joy. It's true that for some these gut feelings come quite easily, but for others, it may take more time and guidance to hone in on what feels most authentic. One great place to start when in need of inspiration is to get an idea of what the current jewelry trends are at the moment. From there, you can peruse the selections, and see what sparks your interest the most.

I recently set out to see what jewelry trends have died down as of late and which trends are having a major moment. To get some firsthand insight into the matter, I reached out to eight brilliant jewelry designers and brands spanning from Los Angeles to New York City to Paris. Keep scrolling to see how each weighed in on the topic and to shop an incredibly stylish selection of earrings, necklaces, bracelets, and rings based on their expert advice—there's a little something for every personal style.

Ariel Gordon Maffei, CEO and designer of Ariel Gordon Jewelry

Out: Rose Gold Pieces
"It really had a moment 5 years ago, but I hardly sell it anymore these days."—Ariel Gordon Maffei

In: Tennis Bracelets 
"I've been having a lot of fun designing new tennis bracelets. I've been wearing  two on repeat with some classic gold bangles. I love how they jangle together and how the bangles are round and rigid while the tennis bracelets are slinky and slither."—Ariel Gordon Maffei

Thomas Montier Leboucher, Co-Founder and CEO of Viltier

Out: Overly Trendy Pieces
"I believe that anything that is too 'fashionable' or too 'on-trend' for a season, let’s say, is out now."—Thomas Montier Leboucher

In: Timeless Bold Pieces 
"People are looking for things that are durable and that will last over time. Jewelry that is popular today has to be bold, significant. Anything but a plain and generic design. People are looking to express themselves and also to belong to something so they will be looking for something that has a story, a signature, beautiful craftsmanship."—Thomas Montier Leboucher

Justine Lançon, Creative Director of Mejuri

Out: Costume Pieces
"We really believe there are no rules when it comes to jewelry; it is a personal choice. However, we are seeing costume pieces being phased out for pieces you can keep and wear forever. It’s less about fads and more about timeless style."—Justine Lançon


In: Personalization
"We have seen a 40% increase in personalization in the last year, which tells us now more than ever, customers are making milestones out of moments with their pieces."—Justine Lançon

Danielle Sherman: Founder and CEO of Sherman Field

Out: Lightweight Pieces
"Whenever anyone feels the need to layer a lot rather than wearing just one or two statement pieces."—Danielle Sherman

In: Unique Statement Pieces 
"Statement jewelry, bold pieces with weight and prominence. Our focus on hand-linked, solid gold 18k chains and customizable photo lockets featuring hard stones like Nephrite Jade and Lapis Lazuli (you pick the stone) feels very special and unique to you. Since so many of our pieces are custom, it's something you do not see everywhere … and we like that."—Danielle Sherman

Jules Binder, Marketing Manager of Bing Bang NYC

Out: Flashy Pieces

"Gaudy jewelry is really not the mood right now. People aren't interested in seeing people show off in these tough times. Also, silver has taken a backseat to gold which wasn't the case a few years back."—Jules Binder

In: Gold Modernist Pieces
"Modernist pieces with smooth edges and a sense of flow feel really of the moment. Our BBA line has been really popular lately because of that. Pieces where you can see the hand of the artisan feel really special right now because small businesses were hurting so much from the pandemic. Gold has definitely taken the spotlight over silver this year and we think that trend will continue."—Jules Binder

Martine Lindskjold and Sofie Holst, Designers at Maria Black Jewelery

Out: Geometric Pieces
"We believe that jewelry has a different lifecycle than fashion pieces like clothes, shoes, etc., and, in that sense, it never really gets outdated. But definitely, there are some trends that we saw 5–10 years ago where a lot of the jewelry was more geometric and sharp in its design."—Martine Lindskjold and Sofie Holst

In: Expressive Pieces
"As for now, the trend of 'crazy' clothing designs is starting to die down, which allows for more 'exciting' jewelry pieces to shine a lot more. We believe that 2022 brings back the visual idea of 'more is more' when it comes to wearing and styling jewelry. Mixing old and new is encouraged. The new generations dare to wear all new kinds of materials and colors, as long as they make a statement and can be used in a way to express personal identity. To our view, bringing new life to old jewelry will never go out of style."—Martine Lindskjold and Sofie Holst

Jenna Katz, Jewelry Designer

Out: Stacked Dainty Pavé Pieces
"Very dainty pavé stacked jewelry is out for me. Has been for a while. While once a mainstay, I think this trend lacks character and personality. Your jewelry should say something about you! "—Jenna Katz

In: Heirloom Quality Pieces
"I am a huge fan of antique diamonds or colored stones in high carat gold; there is something so soulful about the combination. I've been resetting clients antique stones in either 18K, 20K, or 22K gold and there is an heirloom quality to it. You can imagine it will be around for generations to come. The opposite of a trend!"—Jenna Katz

Roxanne Assoulin, Jewelry Designer

Out: Contrived Pieces
"What feels outdated to me is anything that feels uncomfortable or contrived. Anything too pulled together, too matchy-matchy. Anything that tries too hard."—Roxanne Assoulin

In: Bright Uplifting Pieces
"I think, more now than ever, one needs to feel at home in the world, and jewelry, similar to a small vase of brightly colored flowers, can help bring that to life. Small, collected bits, gathered together to make a whole. A couch, a chair, a rug are all important, but the books, the art, the flowers, that's how we sign our names. That's our signature. That's what makes it personal. And I'm a big fan of personal."—Roxanne Assoulin

Related Stories