Hedi Slimane Explains His Fascination With the Skinny Silhouette

Today Yahoo Style released an exclusive interview with Saint Laurent’s Hedi Slimane. The thorough and candid piece, conducted by Dirk Standen through email, answered a valuable amount of questions that have enveloped the label since Slimane’s appointment as creative director in 2012. Everything from why the Yves was dropped to his opinion on the digital revolution to present-day fashion journalism is addressed, and though the article is a start-to-finish must-read, we found his words on his fascination with the skinny silhouette relating to his youth particularly interesting, as well as vulnerable. Scroll down to read the quote, and be sure to tell us your thoughts in the comments below.

Photo:

Victor VIRGILE/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images

What do you say to people who say that you are too obsessed with a certain skinny ideal of youth?
“There is always a part of what you do that refers to your childhood, or youth. I was precisely just like any of these guys I photograph, or that walk my shows. Jackets were always a little too big for me. Many in high school, or in my family, were attempting to make me feel I was half a man because I was lean, and not an athletic build. They were bullying me for some time, so that I might feel uncomfortable with myself, insinuating skinny was ‘queer.’ There was certainly something homophobic and derogative about those remarks. I was eating quite much, doing a lot of sport, but when I was 15, 16, or 17, that was simply the way I was built.

I would turn to my music heroes, and this was comforting. They looked the same and I wanted to do everything to be like them, and not hide myself in baggy clothes to avoid negative comments. David Bowie, Keith Richards, Mick Jagger, Mick Jones, Paul Weller, I felt connected to their allure, aesthetic and style.

There is that idea of androgyny, which is associated to my silhouette and design since the late 90s, and I presume a reflection of how I was, and how I looked growing up, the lack of gender definition. I could recognise it and feel a connection at the time with The Thin White Duke character of Bowie. This is pretty much the origin of everything I did in design after that, a boy or a girl with the same silhouette.”

Scroll to shop our Saint Laurent picks:

Saint Laurent Lulu Dress ($7750)

Saint Laurent Draped Salvage Buckle Studded Belt ($495)

Did you read the full article? Tell us what you liked most about it in the comments below!