True Life: I Never Buy Anything Full-Price

Meghan Blalock

If there’s one kind of addiction that probably doesn’t call for serious treatment, it’s mine: I am addicted to sales. When I find a good designer piece seriously marked down, there is practically nothing that can stop me from purchasing it. If the Internet shut down, all the cell phone towers went dark, and virtually no technology was available, I would walk through wind, fire, and rain to wherever I needed to go, just to get my hands on the delightfully discounted piece.

I’m the kind of person that big business targets when they start slashing prices and using neon colours and crazy fonts to advertise all their insane sales. I’m that person who rationalizes that if I can spend $100 instead of $200 (if something is 50 per cent off, for example), that’s somehow better than skipping the purchase entirely and spending $0. Yes, I’m the person who rationalizes spending a good amount of money when it means that I could have been spending a ton more. Saving $100 is a much better feeling than spending nothing. By far.

Why? A few reasons: First and foremost, I get a major adrenaline rush whenever I’m able to buy a designer piece for way less than the sticker price. That’s where the addiction aspect comes in—the rush of endorphins and the resulting glee I feel when I’ve spent less than what was initially asked for an item is something I want to replicate as much as possible. You might think that normal shopping produces this chemical result too; while retail therapy is definitely real in my book, and shopping is fun and it feels good to buy things, nothing can compare to how good I feel when I buy something I love that I’m getting at a steal. I find it doubly as exciting as a normal shopping experience. Not only are you getting something pretty, but you’re paying so much less for it.

The next reason? It just makes more sense to shop sales. For those of us with less than Kim Kardashian levels of income, paying full price for insanely expensive designer items is usually simply not an option. On a recent trip to New York, I walked into the brand new Céline store in SoHo to survey the scene and to meet a friend—and while I was there, a woman walked in, picked up a handbag, rang it up, and walked out with it. This experience is unfathomable to me, and I like to think that even if I had all the money I could ever hope to have, I would never make my purchases in this way. Why? Because, to be frank, these tactics don’t suggest much intelligence—there are so many legitimate ways to get deals nowadays that buying a full-price bag almost suggests you lack a certain savvy. And make no mistake about it: I’d much rather be savvy than rich.

Finally, for me, there’s a certain aspect of moral transgression I feel when I buy designer goods full price. I hope that no matter how wealthy I grow, I will never be a person who drops $3,000 on a handbag while there are people starving just down the street from me. There are just too many people in the world suffering from poverty—without access to safe water, clean food supplies, and other basic necessities I take so very much for granted—to ever rationalize spending that much money on one luxury item. Do I love beautiful designer things? Absolutely—nothing compares to the feeling of a good pair of pumps or a shiny new handbag that smells of delicious leather. But when I buy it off the rack at full price, it always comes with a painful twinge of guilt—an experience I’d rather be rid of forever.

In short, I am a sale addict. I never buy anything at full price, and I’m more than ok with that. It also doesn’t hurt that I happen to be very good at hunting down sale pieces. Don’t believe me? Keep scrolling to shop 30 designer pieces, all on major sale. Happy shopping! 

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